Trinity College Dublin Campus Pollinator Plan

Welcome

The Trinity Campus Pollinator Plan contributes to a national programme of actions to reverse pollinator decline in Ireland and help to restore healthy pollinator populations. Pollinators ultimately contribute to our economy and wealth, health and well-being, and other wildlife in the wider landscape. The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan (AIPP) has received widespread support from government and non-government organisations, as well as from the public. It has been recognised internationally as an example of best-practice. As one of the organisations supporting the AIPP, Trinity College has the opportunity to contribute to all of the AIPP’s key objectives, namely:

 

  1. Making Ireland pollinator friendly by taking action on our grounds;
  2. Raising awareness of pollinators and how to protect them via teaching and outreach;
  3. Supporting beekeeping on campus;
  4. Expanding our knowledge by delivering on many of the research targets;
  5. Collecting evidence to track change.

The actions in the Campus Pollinator Plan are based on the AIPP “Local Communities: actions to help pollinators”. By working together, we can collectively take steps to protect and restore Irish pollinators.
Trinity is leading the way in city-centre pollinator conservation – not just by implementing the Campus Pollinator Plan, but the development of the AIPP was driven by Trinity Scholar, BA and PhD graduate, Dr Úna Fitzpatrick (now at the National Biodiversity Data Centre), and Trinity College Professor in Botany, Prof. Jane Stout, along with a multi-stakeholder steering group. The AIPP Project Officer (funded by the Heritage Council and Bord Bia), Dr Erin Jo Tiedeken, is also a PhD graduate of Trinity College.

 

Prof Jane Stout, School of Natural Sciences

 

Campus Pollinator Plan Actions

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A: Identify and protect existing areas that are good for pollinators

The main areas providing floral resources/nesting potential are shown on the map below. These floral resources include native and non-native flowering trees and shrubs as well as herbs.

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B: Reduce the frequency of mowing of grassy areas

In some areas, for example, the Flat Iron and the Ecology Bank, this is already occurring. Other potential areas to do this potentially include at the base of trees, along the edges of buildings, fences and squares.


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C: Pollinator friendly planting

Existing resources can be augmented, particularly with native, but also with some non-native flowering plants.

 


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D: Pollinator nesting habitat

Areas of long grass (including the Flat Iron and Ecology Bank) may provide sites for bumblebees to nest and should be left undisturbed until late summer.

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E: Reduce use of pesticides

Reduce with the aim of eliminating the use of insecticides on Campus.



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F:Raise awareness

Via formal teaching/training in taught modules. Current modules which include lectures on value, importance and conservation of pollinators.

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G:Track efforts

Log activity on Actions for Pollinators website.


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Background: why conserve pollinators?

What is pollination?

Pollination occurs when pollen is moved within flowers or carried from flower to flower by pollinating animals or by the wind. The transfer of pollen between flowers of the same species leads to fertilization, and successful seed and fruit production for plants.  Pollination ensures that the plant will produce full-bodied fruit and viable seeds. For crop producers, this means good yields of high quality produce, for consumers, it means the availability of a range of fruit and vegetables at an affordable price, and for the wider environment, it means a healthy ecosystem.

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